Watch: EVERY LITTLE THING

With just about a week to go before our first performance, we’re pleased to release “Every Little Thing,” a very short film inspired by Folk Wandering. This is the second in a series of three very short films, each about a minute in length, designed to bring you a bit further into the hopeful and heartbreaking world of the show.

The series is written and directed by Colby Day*, designed by Christopher Bowser* and Heather McDevitt Barton, filmed by Suzi Sadler, edited by Janna Emig, with music arranged by Blake Allen, recorded by Ben Schrier, and mixed and edited by Chris Ryan. Watch “Every Little Thing” now and grab your tickets today!

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Spotlight on Dan Tracy

Over fifty ferociously imaginative emerging artists are working together to bring our world premiere of Folk Wandering roaring into reality. In advance of our first performance on February 23, we’ll be sharing interviews with each of these artists. These conversations will bring you inside this show’s very unique process of creation, and bring you a bit closer to this brilliant and wild group of emerging artists. Today, we are pleased to bring you a spotlight on Dan Tracy, who is a Pipeline ensemble member and who is playing the dual roles of Harlan and Steve.

Read the full interview below and get your tickets to performances February 23 – March 18 today!

Pipeline Theatre Company: What first attracted you to Folk Wandering?
Dan Tracy: The music. Plain and simple. I first heard a concert performance of an earlier draft of the show back in 2013, and I was struck with how deliciously period-appropriate all the songs were, while at the same time being congruous with each other throughout the show—and being utterly and hauntingly gorgeous.

PTC: What aspect of the Folk Wandering story do you most relate to?
DT: I like to think I relate to (or at least aspire to be) Everett in Kai’s story of pure survival (in a much more metaphorical way than hers). The other two stories are complications of life after the basic necessities have been taken care of, but the characters in Kai’s story literally need food and water. Everett has these needs and yet finds beauty and kindness in the world while starving. And secretly I want to run away and camp in the mountains and hunt for food with a bow and arrow. I would surely die.

PTC: If you were to write a tagline for Folk Wandering, what would it be?
DT: A Song of the America You Think You Know

PTC: What big dreams have you been chasing recently (or would you like to chase)?
DT: I’m originally from Nebraska, and I’ve never felt like I was able to take my heart entirely with me when I moved away six years ago to come to this crazy city. Maybe I won’t move back, but I’d love to find a spot of land somewhere to homestead the good ol’ American Pioneer way; you know, chickens, tomatoes, composting toilets.

PTC: Two truths and a lie, go:
DT: In sixth grade, I broke my leg by kicking somebody else. I’ve never seen the movie Dumb and Dumber. I can whistle over four octaves.

PTC: Tell us about your character in Folk Wandering.
DT: Harlan isn’t a Newsie, but he’s friends with all of them. He’s a classic New York factory kid-turning-grownup who can’t help but see the bright side of everything. Nothing is very complicated in his head.

Steve isn’t a stranger. He’s Steve.


Folk Wandering begins preview performances on February 23, opens on March 4, and runs through March 18. Tickets are now available to all performances. Get your tickets today!

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Volunteer and See Folk Wandering Fo’ Free!

Interested in seeing Folk Wandering FO’ FREE? Join us as a volunteer and we’ll give you a comp (or two, depending on the size of your commitment) in exchange for your efforts!

There are 2 ways to volunteer and earn a comp:

LOAD-IN (February 13-March 1st)

We’ll be building the show over this week and next, and are in most need of support on February 15 (though there are other opportunities to help as well!). We’ll need folks with both artisan experience and/or the ability to lift heavy things and wield a hammer. If this sounds like you email volunteer@pipelinetheatre.org, include the dates and times you are available to help, a brief description of your artisan or building experience, as well as how you first heard about Pipeline and Folk Wandering! We’ll respond with more details and confirm!

FRONT OF HOUSE (February 22 – March 18)

We’ll need 4-5 Front-of-House volunteers per performance throughout the entire run (February 22 – March 18) for various positions including box office, ushering, and bartending. Front-of-House volunteers are able to watch any show at which they’re working. To sign up to volunteer in the front of house, please email volunteer@pipelinetheatre.org and include a brief description of your Front-of-House experience (if any, this is not required) and how you heard about Pipeline and Folk Wandering! We’ll reply with a sign up sheet as well as additional details!

Questions? Email volunteer@pipelinetheatre.org.

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Pipeline to Receive $10,000 Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts

National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Jane Chu has approved more than $25 million in grants as part of the NEA’s first major funding announcement for fiscal year 2018.  Included in this announcement is an Art Works grant of $10,000 to Pipeline Theatre Company for our upcoming world premiere production of Folk Wandering (February 23 – March 18, Mezzanine Theatre at A.R.T./New York Theatres). The Art Works category is the NEA’s largest funding category and supports projects that focus on the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence, public engagement with diverse and excellent art, lifelong learning in the arts, and/or the strengthening of communities through the arts.

“It is energizing to see the impact that the arts are making throughout the United States. These NEA-supported projects, such as this one to Pipeline Theatre Company, are good examples of how the arts build stronger and more vibrant communities, improve well-being, and increase the quality of our lives,” said NEA Chairman Jane Chu. “At the National Endowment for the Arts, we believe that all people should have access to the joy, opportunities and connections the arts bring.”

This marks the first NEA Art Works grant for Pipeline, as well as our single largest grant award to date, both huge and heartwarming milestones for the company. However this news is bitter sweet, as just yesterday we learned that the President’s FY19 budget proposes a complete elimination of the NEA, which could mean this first year will be the only year our small but mighty company and our vibrant and bold community of artists are able to receive this vital support. At Pipeline, our mission focuses on unbridling the imaginations of artists and audiences alike and provoking courage and compassion within our community. We’ve seen first hand the life changing power of the arts and the impact of government support on organizations, small and large, who do this important work. Pipeline cannot engage in advocacy, either directly or indirectly. We will, however, continue to stand alongside our friends at the NEA in the practice of educating about the NEA’s vital role in serving our nation’s communities. More on this from the NEA.

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Spotlight on Ellen Winter

Over fifty ferociously imaginative emerging artists are working together to bring our world premiere of Folk Wandering roaring into reality. In advance of our first performance on February 23, we’ll be sharing interviews with each of these artists. These conversations will bring you inside this show’s very unique process of creation, and bring you a bit closer to this brilliant and wild group of emerging artists. Today, we are pleased to bring you a spotlight on music director, Ellen Winter!

Read the full interview below and get your tickets to performances February 23 – March 18 today!

Pipeline Theatre Company: What first attracted you to Folk Wandering? What made you want to work on this project?
Ellen Winter: I saw Folk Wandering at Polyphone in 2017 and couldn’t stop thinking about it for weeks after. The music, the stories, the characters stayed with me like a welcome haunting. I accosted Neisler at drinks and was basically like, how can I be involved in this beautiful piece, just tell me how.

The music and the stories in this show shook me. I wanted to live in this world of songwriting. To explore it. To operate within it. The lyrics and melodies strike a chord (literally) and I wanted to understand this organic, musical machine. And oh man – it is epic.

PTC: What aspect of the Folk Wandering story do you most relate to?
EW: Hannah’s experience as a woman in the music industry really gets to me. Oof – and Rosie with her New York dreams!

PTC: If you were to write a tagline for Folk Wandering, what would it be?
EW: What will you take with you?

PTC: What big dreams have you been chasing recently (or would you like to chase)?
EW: I’m making my first solo album this year! And that is terrifying/exciting!

PTC: Two truths and a lie, go:
EW: Growing up, I wanted to be an inventor. Running is my go-to method of exercise. Toast with peanut butter, avocado, kale, lemon, and a little bit of pepper is delicious. You’re welcome.

 


Folk Wandering begins preview performances on February 23, opens on March 4, and runs through March 18. Tickets are now available to all performances. Get your tickets today!

Photo by Alison Grasso.

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Spotlight on Chris Bowser

Over fifty ferociously imaginative emerging artists are working together to bring our world premiere of Folk Wandering roaring into reality. In advance of our first performance on February 23, we’ll be sharing interviews with each of these artists. These conversations will bring you inside this show’s very unique process of creation, and bring you a bit closer to this brilliant and wild group of emerging artists. Today, we are pleased to bring you a spotlight on lighting designer Chris Bowser.

Read the full interview below and get your tickets to performances February 23 – March 18 today!

Pipeline Theatre Company: What first attracted you to Folk Wandering? What made you want to work on this project?
Chris Bowser: The people involved–the incredibly enormous number of talented people–are what have always attracted me to Folk Wandering. My first experience with the show was a concert at Joe’s Pub and to see all my talented friends up there having created this thing together was so inspiring. To come back to it now years later and to be brought into that family with so many people I love to work with is a dream.

PTC: What aspect of the Folk Wandering story do you most relate to?
CB: I think Everett might be a soul brother. There’s something about living life simply and fully and existing in a place of constant discovery that is very attractive to me. It makes me feel free from the pressures of ambition and consumption. I find myself singing the lyric “To be able to catch those clouds/to hold them like my father held me/and laugh and laugh,” and I think it is such a beautiful image of a need that lives in all of us.  It’s the antithesis to a busy life in the city in a way that I admire and aspire to–at least part time.

PTC: What big dreams have you been chasing recently (or would you like to chase)?
CB: Bringing theater to people who don’t necessarily seek it out. Tricking people into watching visually and emotionally compelling storytelling. Creating a live performance for the future generations. Making effective hybrid performance models that feel surprising and delightful.

PTC: Two truths and a lie, go:
CB: I went to Space Camp. I’m an only child. I was once an amateur figure skater.

PTC: What first attracted you to your particular specialization?
CB: I started out as a director but looking back I was always interested in visual storytelling. I started a theater company in my basement and was always excited to create little worlds and then to put colorful lights on them. As a director my focus and strength was composition, and it felt like a natural progression to become a designer. I started as a lighting designer and then started getting hired as a scenic designer as well. My ultimate dream is to do both, but I could never pass up an opportunity to work with such a smart bad ass scenic designer as Carolyn Mraz.


Folk Wandering begins preview performances on February 23, opens on March 4, and runs through March 18. Tickets are now available to all performances. Get your tickets today!

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Spotlight on Kate Loprest

Over fifty ferociously imaginative emerging artists are working together to bring our world premiere of Folk Wandering roaring into reality. In advance of our first performance on February 23, we’ll be sharing interviews with each of these artists. These conversations will bring you inside this show’s very unique process of creation, and bring you a bit closer to this brilliant and wild group of emerging artists. Today, we are pleased to bring you a spotlight on Kate Loprest, who is playing the dual roles of Caroline and Catherine.

Read the full interview below and get your tickets to performances February 23 – March 18 today!

Pipeline Theatre Company: What first attracted you to Folk Wandering? What made you want to work on this project?
Kate Loprest: What first attracted me to Folk Wandering was that it’s an ensemble piece wherein everyone is featured. One of my favorite things about being a performer is getting to work with incredible, funny, talented people and ensemble pieces always tend to bring out the best in everyone. I also happen to love the track I’ve been cast in because the roles are so drastically different; I get to play comedy as well as drama, sing folk, rock, and first soprano, use accents. Basically, I’m in my happy, creative place.

PTC: What aspect of the Folk Wandering story do you most relate to?
KL: The first thing I related to was the strength of both the female characters I play in the show. Caroline is very confident and sassy. She really goes for what she wants, which is quite forward thinking for a small-town Indiana girl in 1955. Catherine’s biggest priority is her family; you literally see her fighting and sacrificing for them to have the American dream. I can’t wait to get to know them both better.

PTC: If you were to write a tagline for Folk Wandering, what would it be?
KL: FOLK WANDERING: Swell!

PTC: What big dreams have you been chasing recently (or would you like to chase)?
KL: Being the beginning of a new year, I’ve set a few goals for myself. One of my largest goals, ironically, speaks to this show and that is changing my mindset from surviving to thriving. I live in a crazy, confusing time in the “city that never sleeps” and I often feel like I’m just trying to get by each day. Instead, I’m working to see each day as a gift and an opportunity. It’s not easy, but I think that small change could make a big difference in my life as well as others.

PTC: Two truths and a lie, go:
KL: I’m the oldest of 5 siblings: 4 girls; 1 boy; I told my parents I wanted to work for SeaWorld when I grew up; I performed for Oprah last year!


Folk Wandering begins preview performances on February 23, opens on March 4, and runs through March 18. Tickets are now available to all performances. Get your tickets today!

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Watch: SNOW

With just about a month to go before our first performance, we’re pleased to release “Snow,” a very short film inspired by Folk Wandering. This is the first in a series of three films, each about a minute in length, designed to bring you a bit further into the hopeful and heartbreaking world of the show.

The series is written and directed by Colby Day*, designed by Christopher Bowser* and Heather McDevitt Barton, filmed by Suzi Sadler, edited by Janna Emig, with music arranged by Blake Allen, recorded by Ben Schrier, and mixed and edited by Chris Ryan. Watch “Snow” now and grab your tickets today!

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Spotlight on Adrian Blake Enscoe

Over fifty ferociously imaginative emerging artists are working together to bring our world premiere of Folk Wandering roaring into reality. In advance of our first performance on February 23, we’ll be sharing interviews with each of these artists. These conversations will bring you inside this show’s very unique process of creation, and bring you a bit closer to this brilliant and wild group of emerging artists. Today, we are pleased to bring you a spotlight on Adrian Blake Enscoe, who is playing the role of Bobby Lombardi.

Read the full interview below and get your tickets to performances February 23 – March 18 today!

Pipeline Theatre Company: What first attracted you to Folk Wandering? What made you want to work on this project?
Adrian Blake Enscoe: I loved Backhaus’ way of walking the line between cheeky self-awareness and genuine moments of truth. Love the music from the first bars I heard. Collaboration has always been key for me and it fascinated me that the script and songs balanced so many different voices. And the director: who could be nicer than Andrew Neisler?

PTC: What aspect of the Folk Wandering story do you most relate to?
ABE: I love the idea of trying on old well worn identities of older times to try and somehow understand the idiosyncratic inner lives of those in the past, try to figure what made them do what they did.

Who do I relate to the most: Ominously, the villain. Bobby Lombardi (aka James Dean) is a snake that I see reflections of my less flattering qualities in — the hammy clumsiness, the blindspots for the suffering of those closest to you. Hopefully I’m a bit more self-aware of these flaws…

PTC: If you were to write a tagline for Folk Wandering, what would it be?
ABE: Folk Wandering: untold tales of american loneliness…

PTC: What big dreams have you been chasing recently (or would you like to chase)?
ABE: Escaping the city! Seeing the world! The question I’ve got to ask, though, is: is it something am I chasing or something I’m running away from?

PTC: Two truths and a lie, go:

ABE: 1. I performed in a children’s circus in my younger days where I learned to ride a unicycle, fly trapeze, and walk tightrope.

2. You can see my acting debut in the movie Love Actually, where I played one of the shepherds in the nativity children’s play at the end singing “Catch a Falling Star and Put it in Your Pocket.”

3. Strangely, I have a weird grasp of Russian language (neither of my parents are Russian), to the point of being able to recite several poems from memory. Alexandr Pushkin is my fave.

PTC: Tell us about your character in Folk Wandering.
ABE: Bobby Lombardi is the closest thing in the show to a villain: a portrait a white straight men blind to the plight of any other human being. Everything he does, even suffering, is for the attention. I’m walking a weird line here because he’s a real human character that I can deeply relate to — just steeped in the absurdity of vanity and self-centered-ness amped all the way to 11.


Folk Wandering begins preview performances on February 23, opens on March 4, and runs through March 18. Tickets are now available to all performances. Get your tickets today!

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Spotlight on Joel Esher

The music for our upcoming world premiere musical, Folk Wandering, was composed collaboratively by nine emerging singer songwriters. In advance of our first performance on February 23, we’ll be sharing interviews with each of these composers, as well as with many of the key artists involved in the production. These conversations will bring you inside this show’s very unique process of creation, and bring you a bit closer to this brilliant and wild group of emerging artists. Today, we are pleased to bring you a spotlight on composer Joel Esher.

Read the full interview below and get your tickets to performances February 23 – March 18 today!

Pipeline Theatre Company: How do you identify as an artist?
Joel Esher: I identify as a composer/lyricist!

PTC: How did you come to work on Folk Wandering?
JE: I may have been one of the first people Jaclyn and Andrew approached about FW! I remember sitting down with them, they played the music video of “Home” by Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros and talked about their initial concept for a show exploring America through the lens of these traveling wanderers. This was before the first devising sessions. I knew Neisler and Jaclyn from helping out on an Andrew Farmer play, Our Farm, as a piano-playing dog and contributing to Fresh Ground Pepper events as an artist.

PTC: What has been different about this writing process, compared to others you’ve been a part of?
JE: As we’ve written together, I think we all feel that we have settled into specific roles (one of us often sits at the piano, one of us is singing, one of us is keeping an eye/ear out for the dramatic context and making sure we’re “staying on target”, etc).

PTC: What has been exciting to you about working with so many collaborators?
JE: The most cathartic and exciting moments have been when we challenge ourselves to step outside of those roles.

PTC: If you were to write a tagline for Folk Wandering, what would it be?
JE: Women unite across time to better understand, and hopefully save, the soul of America.


Folk Wandering begins preview performances on February 23, opens on March 4, and runs through March 18. Tickets are now available to all performances. Get your tickets today!

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