Watch “Poor Babe in the Woods”

Just can’t wait for the The Gray Man? Well now you don’t have to.

Get an early look with our very short film: Poor Babe in the Woods

And grab your tickets before September 8 to get that early bird rate. Why pay more when you don’t have to? Get Tix.

Become an Associated Work

We’ve got a space and we’re looking to fill it! Throughout the course of The Gray Man, we’re programming in one-night-only engagements on each of our dark nights. Currently, October 6 is still available. Got a reading, workshop, or other small event in need of a home? Email natalie@pipelinetheatre.org for rates and details.

Posted in Uncategorized |

Early Bird Tickets Now On Sale!

Early bird tickets to The Gray Man are now on sale! Prices increase on September 8, why pay more if you don’t have to? Click here to get your tix!

The Gray Man

by Andrew Farmer
directed by Andrew Neisler

September 24- October 18
Walker Space, 46 Walker St., NYC
Tickets: $15 – $30

The Gray Man isn’t real. He’s a ghost story, a boogeyman mothers make up tales about to keep their children safe.

A grieving young man named Simon listens to these bedtime stories outside his apartment window and yearns to leave the city he’s so afraid of. But when he meets a little girl with an old soul who speaks of missing children, Simon can’t help but feel trapped in his tenement house, where a familiar shadow waits in the darkness.

Posted in Uncategorized |

Support The Gray Man on Kickstarter

Our upcoming production of The Gray Man will take our artists and audience on a whole new kind journey into a dark and haunting, but also delicate and beautiful new world. To build this world, we need resources – more than ever before. And to get those resources, we need your help.

Today Pipeline launches our first ever Kickstarter. We’re involving our community in a whole new way, and we hope you’ll be a part of it.

Click here to help us raise $10,000 by September 11, 2015.

Kickstarter

We have some enticing perks (your own scary story, tickets to our events, super insider access, and more) but we know that’s not really why you give. You give because you care about this production, these artists, and our mission to provoke courage and compassion through imagination. Support Pipeline as we take on our most ambitious show yet.

Learn More About The Gray Man

Posted in Uncategorized |

It has both cavemen and sentient robots, an interview with Colby Day

Day_EditedThe world premiere reading of Colby Day’s latest play, Untitled Time Dilation Play, directed by Stefanie Abel Howoritz, is coming up on July 10 at 7:30PM as part of our Bonfire Series. Read our interview with Colby below to learn more about this project and also to maybe help Colby name his play.

And reserve your seat now to Untitled Time Dilation Play, July 10, 7PM, South Oxford Space (138 S. Oxford St.).

Pipeline Theatre Company: What do you want us to know about your play?

Colby Day: The title. Seriously. I need one of you out there to come, hear it, and tell me what it’s called. The story starts at the Big Bang, has a couple pit stops with people loosely connected to one another along the way, and ends when the universe does: once energy reaches its final resting state. Tell me what to call this.

 PTC: When and where did you decide to start writing this play? Why?

CD: I think I decided to write this play while watching the movie Noah. Which is not good. But is a big epic and I’ve been really into big epics lately and wanted to do something like that, on a large scale, about what it means to be human and if there is a god (probably not but that’s cool) and how we’re supposed to exist in the world.

Then of course, figure out how the heck to do something epic about the size of humanity in a little intimate way on stage. I like setting challenges.

PTC: What excites you most about this project?

CD: It has both cavemen and sentient robots. How could you not be excited?

PTC: In once sentence, tell us something strange that happens in your play.

CD: There are a couple transitions where the stage directions read: “We skip 45,000 years here.”

PTC: Are you working on anything else? What?

CD: TOO MUCH. I am all about #contentcreation. Lately I’ve been writing some short movie things which are really fun and strange. I have a Twitter account where I pitch my worst (best) TV show ideas: @unpitched. I’m also programming a series at The Tank in August where I’ll present a “Guided Memory Tour” I’ve been working on.

PTC: Two truths and a lie, go:

CD: I can make myself cry on command (by thinking about space)

 My grandfather, father, uncle, and I all have a scar in the exact same place

My mom is a terrible driver and once hit a cow on a family road trip

PTC: What’s next for you?

CD: I host an indie alt-comedy show at people’s homes around NYC, which is coming up in early August. Readings at The Tank (from me and other cool cats) in late August. Then Crashbox Theater is producing my play Kitchen Sink Experiment(s) in the fall, directed by Andrew Scoville. Like my Facebook page (Facebook.com/thecolbyday) to hear about all of these. I’m also going to a lot of weddings if you want to be my date.

About Untitled Time Dilation Play

by Colby Day | directed by Stefanie Abel Horowitz
July 10, 7:30PM
138 South Oxford St., Brooklyn
Reserve Your Seat

The Big Bang. A lot happens. Entropy brings the universe to rest. Lights out.

Posted in Uncategorized |

This troubling, thrilling nucleus, an interview with Adam Fried

Fried_EditedThe world premiere reading of Adam Fried’s latest play, Serpent in Quicksilver, directed by Chris Mirto, is coming up on July 19, 7pM, as part of our Bonfire Series. Read his interview below to learn more about this romantic, tragic, violent, emotional, and magical play.

And reserve your seat now for Serpent in Quicksilver, July 19, 7PM, South Oxford Space (138 S. Oxford St.).

Pipeline Theatre Company: What do you want us to know about your play?

Adam Fried: It’s dreamlike and harsh, romantic and tragic, with a classic narrative structure, witty banter, graphic violence, strong emotion, and card tricks. It’s a fusion of Powell’s “The Red Shoes” and Lynch’s “Blue Velvet”, a shotgun marriage between Fellini and Tennessee Williams, a fevered dream of Antonin Artaud whispered into the ear of Orson Welles.

PTC: When and where did you decide to start writing this play? Why?

AF: The germ of the idea took root many years ago when my aunt and uncle described a disturbing magic show they had recently seen, similar to the one at the beginning of my play. A jumble of images and ideas slowly attached themselves to this troubling, thrilling nucleus, and yet it always felt just out of reach, an elusive, tantalizing thing that I could never get right. It’s been percolating inside my head now for decades, and I promised myself I would write it only when I felt I was good enough to realize it properly. That time, I think, has finally arrived. I hope you agree.

PTC: What excites you most about this project?

AF: Beyond its personal relevance, I’m very pleased to try my hand at a kind of Gesamtkunstwerk, unifying all the different kinds of art that I love into one multi-course banquet, or at the very least, blending them into a tasty theatrical smoothie that’s savory, salty, bitter and sweet.

PTC: In once sentence, tell us something strange that happens in your play.

AF: It rains calla lilies.

PTC: Are you working on anything else? What?

AF: At the moment, I’m developing the play I wrote for Pipeline’s Matchstick Series into a two-night, site-specific crime epic, as well as completing the final play in my magnum opus, “Johnson Hates Boswell (Pt. 1: Talking for Victory, Pt. 2: My Dearest Enemy, Pt. 3: The Flower of Coping”).

PTC: Two truths and a lie, go:

AF: 1. Wes Anderson once asked me for my moussaka recipe.

2. I’ve brought a man back from the dead.

3. There’s a building in The Bronx named after me. 

PTC: What’s next for you?

AF: I’m shooting a number of short films over the summer, finishing up work on a feature length documentary titled “Building a 747 in Mid-Flight”, honing a new live sketch comedy show, and hopefully getting a good night’s sleep.

About Serpent in Quicksilver

by Adam Fried | directed by Chris Mirto
July 19, 7:00PM
138 South Oxford St., Brooklyn
Reserve Your Seat

A magician and his daughter reenact a trauma from their past, nightly on stage, while embarking with a new apprentice on a quest for atonement through the power of art.

Posted in Uncategorized |

Time collapses in on itself, an interview with Jerry Lieblich

Lieblich_EditedThe world premiere reading of Jerry Lieblich’s latest play, Nostalgia is a Mild Form of Grief, directed by Lee Sunday Evans, is coming up on July 12 as part of our Bonfire Series. Read our interview with Jerry below to learn more about this project and also his strange pre-occupation with teeth.

And reserve your seat now for Nostalgia is a Mild Form of Grief, July 12, 7:00PM, South Oxford Space (138 S. Oxford St., Brooklyn).

Pipeline Theatre Company: What do you want us to know about your play?

Jerry Lieblich: It’s about associative memory, thick spaces, and the difficulty of encountering your own history.

PTC: When and where did you decide to start writing this play? Why?

JL: I started the play at this beautiful and intense and difficult silent writing retreat that Erik Ehn runs in the middle of the desert in Texas. The idea is to come in with nothing, and leave a week of monastic silence with a completed draft of something. This play is that something. It’s a big and wild and wooly creature, and I’ve been doing my best to befriend it.

PTC: What excites you most about this project?

JL: It’s technically very difficult (which, I love a good puzzle) while also being incredibly close to my heart. I’m really experimenting with writing from my own autobiography here, which is something I haven’t really done before (and which I find rather terrifying / difficult). So from a process standpoint, it’s incredibly fulfilling.

PTC: In once sentence, tell us something strange that happens in your play.

JL: Time collapses into itself (whatever that means).

PTC: Are you working on anything else? What?

JL: I’ve just started doing research on a new play about the German mystic/scientist/crazy person Athanasius Kircher, and his strange rivalry with Descartes. I’ve never written anything historical before (I’ve never even taken a history class), so this feels very outside my wheelhouse. I’m also developing a new show with my company, Tiny Little Band, about ambition, heroes, myth, and tech startups. We’re going to Maine in a few weeks to workshop that one, so that should be fun (or at least bucolic).

PTC: Two truths and a lie, go:

JL: I once broke a tooth bungie jumping

I have a weirdly vivid memory of losing a tooth while eating Rice Krispies Treats Cereal (which used to be a thing, and used to be my favorite cereal)

I have recurring nightmares of my teeth falling out

PTC: What’s next for you?

JL: I’m actually writing this as I’m preparing to go to my parent’s house for the weekend, with my girlfriend. Research or pleasure? Who knows.

About Nostalgia is a Mild Form of Grief

by Jerry Lieblich | directed by Lee Sunday Evans
July 12, 7:00PM
138 South Oxford St., Brooklyn
Reserve Your Seat

Katie, a photographer, goes home to look at some baby pictures. What she finds is a house oppressively thick with her own history. Maybe remembering the memory will make it easier this time…

Posted in Uncategorized |

It happens to be on a spaceship, an interview with Claire

Kiechel_EditedThe world premiere reading of Claire Kiechel’s Pilgrims, directed by Stefanie Abel Horowitz, is coming up on July 18 as part of the Bonfire Series. Read her interview below to learn how her play about a cruise ship became a play about a spaceship, and her thoughts on writing the unknown into existence.

And reserve your seat now for Pilgrims, July 18, 7:30PM, South Oxford Space (138 S. Oxford St., Brooklyn).

Pipeline Theatre Company: What do you want us to know about your play?

Claire Kiechel: Preferably not too much! But I guess I can say that Pilgrims is a play about two people embarking on a journey alone and together. And it happens to be on a spaceship.

PTC: When and where did you decide to start writing this play? Why?

CK: I actually proposed an entirely different play to Pipeline about a cruise ship and a 16 year old girl detective. I wanted to write a straight forward comedy about death and the American way. But of course, things change and after going on a cruise by myself and working on some early pages with the talented director Katie Lupica and some amazing actors at the Cincinnati Playhouse in January, I realized that the heart of the story was about these two characters I had dreamed up – a former soldier, and a young woman – and that they didn’t belong on a cruise ship.

During my residency at the Millay Colony I read books about the history of post traumatic stress in our culture and was struck by the difference in the ways we see and treat PTSD resulting from war versus the ways we treat PTSD resulting from sexual assault. I was also reading a lot of Virginia Woolf and Kurt Vonnegut for fun, but became interested in how each used conventions of fantasy and science fiction in order to describe and examine the anxieties and dreams of their respective eras.

With Pilgrims, what I’m trying to do is use a familiar situation – earth colonists on a space ship – to explore the nature of trauma and how trauma can both bind us together and tear us apart. How do two traumatized individuals, both longing to escape their past selves, forge a connection? How do words and bodies fail us? How do we create the fantasies we need in order to survive? Does war and colonization spring from a basic desire to touch and be touched?

PTC: What excites you most about this project?

CK: I’m excited about writing a play that follows an emotional logic rather than a dramaturgical one. There are scenes in this play that don’t have a logical reason for existing, except that they do, they are unavoidable and to take them out would make the play a lie. Easier, more comprehensible, but a lie.

Lately I have been inspired by the writings of Marguerite Duras, Maria Irene Fornès, and Virginia Woolf, women who listened to themselves, who followed their own logic, who were their own escape artists. It’s really fucking hard to listen to yourself, and to let yourself write the unknown into existence.

PTC: In one sentence, tell us something strange that happens in your play.

CK: A quarantine, a robot, a haunting, an alien, a pirate, a detective, a lie.

PTC: Are you working on anything else? What?

CK: Right now, I’m in the amazing Fresh Ground Pepper PlayGround PlayGroup which I’m using to work on my piece Lulu is Hungry with the director Phil Gates. It’s a loose adaptation of Wedekind’s The Lulu Plays, but I’m interested in using the original to track the figure of the “Girl” across the 20th century. Kate Zambreno has this amazing quote that I find useful about this figure and the artists obsessed with her – “They fetishized the actress-hysteric, the spastic flapper-girl, the witty mystic, the lovely mental patient, they sucked her bone dry.” I think the “manic pixie dream girl” conceit of today is totally related, but really it’s all women who are seen as “crazy” or “wild” and who are fetishized and pursued, and then ultimately punished or destroyed for their perceived “appetites.” Some people we’re looking at are: Louise Brooks, Zelda Fitzgerald, Tippi Hedren, Edie Sedgwick, and Taylor Swift.

I’m also working on my newest play you’re nothing to no one to me, an adult fairy tale about the pleasures and dangers of story-telling that asks the question of who is allowed to tell stories in our culture. It’s a play with music, so I’m also getting into more song writing at the moment.

PTC: Two truths and a lie, go:

CK: I buy my bread on the internet.

I have never bought clothes on the internet.

It is raining now.

PTC: What’s next for you?

CK: I’m really excited to be going to the Sewanee Writers’ Conference at the end of July as a Tennessee Williams Scholar. It’s going to be hot.

About Pilgrims

by Claire Kiechel | directed by Stefanie Abel Horowitz
July 18, 7:30PM
138 S. Oxford St., Brooklyn
Reserve Your Seat

On a ship to colonize a newly discovered planet, a soldier and a teenage girl find themselves quarantined in one of the ship’s cabins with only an outdated robot and each other for company. Suddenly, they’re forced to explore their own traumatic pasts and roles in a dying society.

Posted in Uncategorized |

When I was in Bosnia, an interview with Jeremy Wine

Wine_EditedJeremy Wine’s latest draft of Proximity, directed by Kel Haney, will premiere on July 16 as part of our Bonfire Series. Read his interview below to learn more about this project and his next much much much bigger project.

And reserve your seat now for Proximity, July 16, 7:30PM, South Oxford Space (138 S. Oxford St., Brooklyn).

Pipeline Theatre Company: What do you want us to know about your play? 

Jeremy Wine: The play is an entirely plausible supposition of what could have happened 20 years ago. When 20 years ago, someone very influential changed their mind in a way not even the person credited with changing his mind can explain.

PTC: When and where did you decide to start writing this play? Why?

JW: I started writing this play, in a sense, when I was in Bosnia. I started writing 50 plays when I was in Bosnia, because I felt it would take 50 plays to come to an understanding of what the hell happened to two very funny friends of mine.

PTC: What excites you most about this project? 

JW: It tries to work on several different levels at once. You’ve got ethnic cleansing, ass sex jokes, the first generation of drones used in war, hoagies, two historical figures, experimental neuroscience, diplomacy. But it’s really a fight about love.

PTC: In once sentence, tell us something strange that happens in your play.

JW: The main character sees and converses with Nikola Tesla because she’s been using his more obscure inventions on her brain.

PTC: Are you working on anything else? What?

JW: I’ve started a new play. It has something to do with a deck of cards and an obscenely obvious amount of blood.

PTC: Two truths and a lie, go:

JW: My wife is in labor right now.

I recently learned I had another brother I never knew existed.

I don’t think I know how to spell anymore.

PTC: What’s next for you?

JW: The rest of 2015 will be dominated by the dark oubliette that is surviving a newborn. Talk to me in January.

About Proximity

by Jeremy Wine | directed by Kel Haney
July 16, 7:30PM
138 S. Oxford St., Brooklyn
Reserve Your Seat

Munderton, an underground inventor on the forefront of the early days of drone research, has been repeating unauthorized experiments out of Nikola Tesla’s confiscated notebooks. Pressured by the leading diplomat negotiating peace in Yugoslavia, she is caught between helping end the war, repairing Tesla’s legacy, and Kevin, the sandwich delivery guy.

Posted in Uncategorized |

It’s a bit randy, an interview with Salty Brine

Brine_EditedThe world premiere reading of Salty Brine’s Let Me Be Frank, directed by Jesse Thurston, is coming up on July 17 as part of our Bonfire Series. Read our interview with Salty below to learn more about this project and why he considers it a bit randy.

And reserve your seat now for Let Me Be Frank, July 17 at 7:30PM, South Oxford Space (138 S. Oxford St., Brooklyn).

Pipeline Theatre Company: What do you want us to know about your play?

Salty Brine: It’s about sexual education in America; It’s about a sex ed class that covers just about everything a sex-ed class doesn’t cover. So it’s a bit randy. Which is exciting. And hopefully surprising.

PTC: When and where did you decide to start writing this play? Why?

SB: I’ve been thinking about writing this play for years. I can’t remember when or where the idea came. But I do remember realizing, years after I’d lived it, how cheated I’d been by my sex-ed class. It had absolutely nothing to do with me. And how angry that made me. And I’ve daydreamed over the years about finding myself in a room with a bunch of teenagers, locking the door, and telling them everything I’ve learned that I wish someone would have told me. It struck me that that’s probably not going to happen. Because, for a number of terrible reasons, we’re not supposed to do so. The truth is considered too dangerous. So I decided I’d just take that daydream and make it into a play.

PTC: What excites you most about this project?

SB: Dirty words? Sexy topics? No. I imagine it’s exacting a kind of revenge on my high school that’s most exciting. I think that’s healthy, don’t you?

PTC: In one sentence, tell us something strange that happens in your play.

SB: A globe is used for a very odd purpose.

PTC: Are you working on anything else? What?

SB: Oh yes! I’m running a weekly series which I call my Spectacular Living Record Collection Cabaret. Every Wednesday night I perform a show I’ve built around an entire, amazing album. And every month we change the album. So there’s always a new show and something exciting to see and hear. If you want to know more: www.thesaltiestbrine.com.

PTC: Two truths and a lie, go:

SB: I’m considered Rhode Island royalty.

I’m just mad about shoes. 

I didn’t eat eggs until I was 26.

PTC: What’s next for you?

SB: More cabaret! And a vacation! And then more cabaret! And more plays!

About Let Me Be Frank

by Salty Brine | directed by Jesse Thurston
July 17, 7:30PM
138 S. Oxford St, Brooklyn
Reserve Your Seat

The students at North Langdon High are scheduled to start sex-ed today. But their teacher, Frank Dosier, has been asked to remove himself from school grounds due to allegations that he might be— ehem— gay. What starts as a lecture on the fertilization of an ovum quickly becomes a down-and-dirty, no-holds-bar manifesto of pleasure and passion. The students find themselves confronted with the realities of a sexually active lifestyle. And Frank finds himself in the midst of a classroom hijacking that might just change his life.

Posted in Uncategorized |

Take 5 Minutes & Win Tix to The Gray Man

At Pipeline, we’re working to build a more courageous and compassionate world by unbridling the imaginations of our artists and audience members. To better understand our impact, we’ve realized we need to know a bit more about exactly whose imaginations we’re reaching.

If you have attended a Pipeline event within the last two years, we want to know more about you. Complete this brief survey by June 29, 5PM ET (that’s one week from today) and you’ll be entered to win a pair of tickets to our upcoming production of Andrew Farmer’s The Gray Man (September 23 – October 18, Walker Space). It should take you no more than 5 minutes to complete, and you’ll be providing us with information that will help us better understand our current audience, as well as guide our community building and outreach efforts for years to come.

Take Survey

The survey is built to collect demographic information, so it will ask you questions about age, ethnicity, gender, income, relationship status, and education. You will have the option to remain anonymous, and to skip any question.

Thanks in advance for your participation, and we look forward to seeing you at our upcoming Bonfire Series (July 9 – 19, South Oxford Space) and this Fall at The Gray Man!

Posted in Uncategorized |